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Welcome to Kids @ Queens Library !!

Summer Reading 2016

Get in the game this summer and slam-dunk some reading goals. The annual Summer Reading Program at Queens Library is back and celebrations are better than ever. Track your progress as you read!

Summer Reading 2016 begins June 9.

Click here for more information.

Summer Reading 2016

TumbleBookLibrary

TumbleBookLibrary is an online collection of animated,talking picture books which inspires young children to love reading. Click here to get started!

TumbleBookLibrary

Reading Down Your Fees

Owe the library money? Get a $1 coupon for reading half an hour at any library. Read anything of your choice!

Reading Down Your Fees

Go Green!

Kids and families can welcome the spring season with environmentally friendly programs at our Greening libraries. Click here to learn more! 

Go Green!

Children’s Library Discovery Center

The Children's Library Discovery Center is now open. It includes hands-on interactive exhibits and learning labs to enable children ages 3-12 to find information and to inspire interest in books, reading, and learning while discovering the joy of scientific exploration.

Children’s Library Discovery Center

How to Start Writing Poetry: The Kids Edition

Posted by: tlaffernis, July 14, 2016 2:01 pm
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Summer Poetry Contest writing tips

If your little one loves words and games, poetry is a great way for them to express their creativity! Here, we’ve detailed a few ways to get those creative juices flowing. Once they’ve finished their new masterpiece, they can submit it to the Summer Poetry Contest for the chance to be published in Queens Library Magazine!

Here are a few tips to get started:

1. Check out some poetry books for your kids to enjoy, and get an understanding of basic concepts like syllables and rhyme. We love classics like Shel Silverstein’s Where the Sidewalk Ends, The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear, and Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll.

2. Have them try to write new words for their favorite song verse so they start getting a feel for rhyming.

3. Do some writing exercises. Simply walking around the block and having them describe whatever they see in one or two sentences is a great start! Using adjectives is a fun way to get specific and gives the poem interesting details.

4. Have fun with acrostic poems! Use your child’s name to start, and pick a word represented by each letter of their name.

5. Experiment with haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry form. The first and third lines are five syllables each, and the middle line is seven syllables. They don’t have to rhyme!

Now you know how to get started, it’s time to write! When it’s ready, enter the Summer Poetry Contest!

Plus, if you’re a wordsmith yourself, read How to Start Writing Poetry: The Adults Edition.

Sources:
http://www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/tips-howtos/help-child-write-poem-30317.html
http://www.poetry4kids.com/blog/lessons/poetry-writing-lessons/   


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