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Susceptibility

Historically, Broad Channel, Howard Beach and the Rockaways have been susceptible to extreme weather events & related conditions including, but not limited to, the following:

 

EXTREME TEMPERATURE EVENTS

Extreme temperature events can be defined in several ways using daily data from Central Park since 1900. The NPCC uses the following metrics:

  • Individual days with maximum temperatures at or above 90°F
  • Individual days with maximum temperatures at or above 100°F
  • Heat waves, defined as three consecutive days with maximum temperatures
    at or above 90°F
  • Individual days with minimum temperatures at or below 32°F

New York City Panel on Climate Change

 

EXTREME PRECIPITATION, COASTAL FLOODING & STORM SURGES

Precipitation is considered extreme when there is more than 1, 2 or 4 inches of precipitation in any given day. These resources contain additional information about flooding hazards in our coastal city:

FEMA Flood Hazard Data for NJ and NY
http://www.region2coastal.com/bestdata

National Weather Service
Introduction to Storm Surge
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/hurricane/resources/surge_intro.pdf

 

HURRICANES, TROPICAL CYCLONES, TROPICAL STORMS & TROPICAL DEPRESSIONS

Hurricanes are an intense form of tropical cyclone. Tropical cyclones are categorized based on their wind speeds. In addition to hurricanes, tropical storms and tropical depressions (also classified by wind speed) also impact the New York City area.
—New York City Panel on Climate Change

Visit these websites for more information about extreme weather events and preparing for them:

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshws.php

NYC Hurricane Evacuation Zone Map
http://maps.nyc.gov/hurricane/

National Weather Service
National Hurricane Center
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

National Weather Service
Hurricane Safety and Preparedness Fact Sheet
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/hurricane/resources/hurricanesafety_flyer.pdf

 

NOR'EASTERS

[Nor’easters] can form over land or over the coastal waters. These winter weather events
are notorious for producing heavy snow, rain, and tremendous waves that crash onto
Atlantic beaches, often causing beach erosion and structural damage. Wind gusts associated with these storms can exceed hurricane force in intensity. A nor’easter gets its name from
the continuously strong northeasterly winds blowing in from the ocean ahead of the storm
and over the coastal areas.

—NOAA’s National Weather Service

National Weather Service
Know the Dangers of Nor’easters
http://www.noaa.gov/features/03_protecting/noreasters.html

 

Climate change research, modeling and projections indicate that these areas will only become more
susceptible to storm surges, hurricanes, and Nor’easters as ocean levels increase and storms intensify (Horton, Bader, Rosenzweig, DeGaetano, & Solecki, 2014).