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ISBN#9780062027467
BIB ID#1594316
Call# 423.09 S

The story of ain't

0
Author
Publisher
New York : HarperCollins Publishers, 2012.
Subjects
Description
xiv, 349 pages ; 24 cm.
Summary
"In 1934, Webster's Second was the great gray eminence of American dictionaries, with 600,000 entries and numerous competitors but no rivals. It served as the all-knowing guide to the world of grammar and information, a kind of one-stop reference work. In 1961, Webster's Third came along and ignited an unprecedented controversy in America's newspapers, universities, and living rooms. The new dictionary's editor, Philip Gove, had overhauled Merriam's long held authoritarian principles to create a reference work that had "no traffic with...artificial notions of correctness or authority. It must be descriptive not prescriptive." Correct use was determined by how the language was actually spoken, and not by "notions of correctness" set by the learned few. Gove's editorial approach had editors and scholars longing for Webster's Second. Reporters across the country sounded off on Gove and his dictionary. The New York Times complained that Webster's had "surrendered to the permissive school that has been busilyextending its beachhead on English instruction," the Times called on Merriam to preserve the printing plates for Webster's Second, so that a new start could be made. And soon Dwight MacDonald, a formidable American critic and writer, emerged as Webster'sThird's chief nemesis when in the pages of the New Yorker he likened the new dictionary to the end of civilization."--

Reviews and Notes

Summary/Annotation ->  Created by the most respected American publisher of dictionaries and supervised by the editor Philip Gove, Webster's Third broke with tradition, adding thousands of new words and eliminating "artificial notions of correctness," basing proper usage on how language was actually spoken. The dictionary's revolutionary style sparked what David Foster Wallace called "the Fort Sumter of the Usage Wars." Editors and scholars howled for Gove's blood, calling him an enemy of clear thinking, a great relativist who was trying to sweep the English language into chaos. Critics bayed at the dictionary's permissive handling of ain't. Literary intellectuals such as Dwight Macdonald believed the dictionary's scientific approach to language and its abandonment of the old standard of usage represented the unraveling of civilization. Entertaining and erudite, The Story of Ain't describes a great societal metamorphosis, tracing the fallout of the world wars, the rise of an educated middle class, and the emergence of America as the undisputed leader of the free world, and illuminating how those forces shaped our language. Never before or since has a dictionary so embodied the cultural transformation of the United States.

Availability

LocationCall Numbersort iconItem TypeVolumeBarcodeStatus
Central Adult Non-Fiction423.09 SAdult Hard Cover0228568218496Available
Flushing423.09 SAdult Hard Cover0228545929264Available
Central Adult Non-Fiction423.09 SAdult Hard Cover0228561730521Available

Marc Record

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$a The story of ain't : $b America, its language, and the most controversial dictionary ever published / $c David Skinner.
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$a First edition.
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$a New York : $b HarperCollins Publishers, $c 2012.
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$a xiv, 349 pages ; $c 24 cm.
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$a Includes bibliographical references.
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$a "In 1934, Webster's Second was the great gray eminence of American dictionaries, with 600,000 entries and numerous competitors but no rivals. It served as the all-knowing guide to the world of grammar and information, a kind of one-stop reference work. In 1961, Webster's Third came along and ignited an unprecedented controversy in America's newspapers, universities, and living rooms. The new dictionary's editor, Philip Gove, had overhauled Merriam's long held authoritarian principles to create a reference work that had "no traffic with...artificial notions of correctness or authority. It must be descriptive not prescriptive." Correct use was determined by how the language was actually spoken, and not by "notions of correctness" set by the learned few. Gove's editorial approach had editors and scholars longing for Webster's Second. Reporters across the country sounded off on Gove and his dictionary. The New York Times complained that Webster's had "surrendered to the permissive school that has been busilyextending its beachhead on English instruction," the Times called on Merriam to preserve the printing plates for Webster's Second, so that a new start could be made. And soon Dwight MacDonald, a formidable American critic and writer, emerged as Webster'sThird's chief nemesis when in the pages of the New Yorker he likened the new dictionary to the end of civilization."-- $c Provided by publisher.
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$a Gove, Philip Babcock, $d 1902-1972.
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$a Webster's third new international dictionary of the English language unabridged.
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