Cover image for From BetaMax to Blockbuster

From BetaMax to Blockbuster

Author
Publisher
Cambridge, Mass. : The MIT Press, 2007.
Description
p. cm.
Call #
384.558 G
Subjects
ISBN #
9780262072908

 

ID #
1184918

 

Availability

LocationCall NumberItem TypeVolumeBarcodesort iconStatus
East Flushing384.558 GAdult Hard Cover0228525538804Available
Central Adult Non-Fiction384.558 GAdult Hard Cover0228519665167Available
Central Adult Non-Fiction384.558 GAdult Hard Cover0228516042485Available
Cambria Heights384.558 GAdult Hard Cover0228515808548Available

Reviews and Notes

Summary/Annotation ->  The first video cassette recorders were promoted in the 1970s as an extension of broadcast television technology--a time-shifting device, a way to tape TV shows. Early advertising for Sony's Betamax told potential purchasers "You don't have to miss Kojakbecause you're watching Columbo." But within a few years, the VCR had been transformed from a machine that recorded television into an extension of the movie theater into the home. This was less a physical transformation than a change in perception, but one that relied on the very tangible construction of a network of social institutions to support this new marketplace for movies. In From Betamax to Blockbuster,Joshua Greenberg explains how the combination of neighborhood video stores and the VCR created a world in which movies became tangible consumer goods. Greenberg charts a trajectory from early "videophile" communities to the rise of the video store--complete with theater marquee lights, movie posters, popcorn, and clerks who offered expert advice on which movies to rent. The result was more than a new industry; by placing movies on cassette in the hands (and control) of consumers, video rental and sale led to a renegotiation of the boundary between medium and message, and ultimately a new relationship between audiences and movies. Eventually, Blockbuster's top-down franchise store model crowded local video stores out of the market, but the recent rise of Netflix, iTunes, and other technologies have reopened old questions about what a movie is and how (and where) it ought to be watched. By focusing on the "spaces in between" manufacturers and consumers, Greenberg's account offers a fresh perspective on consumer technology, illustrating how the initial transformation of movies from experience into commodity began not from the top down or the bottom up, but from the middle of the burgeoning industry out.

Marc Record

01057cam a22003378a 4500
001
vtls001184918
003
NJQ
005
20080925122400.0
008
070504s2007 mau b 001 0 eng
010
 
 
$a 2007-18942 $o ocn125403304
020
 
 
$a 0262072904 (hbk.) : $c $24.95
020
 
 
$a 9780262072908
035
 
 
$a stmpAMU-4803
039
 
9
$a 200809251224 $b VLOAD $c 200807011649 $d VLOAD $y 200806232205 $z load
040
 
 
$a DLC $c DLC $d BTCTA
049
 
 
$a ZQPM
082
 
 
$a 384.55/8 $2 22
099
 
 
$a 384.558 G
100
1
 
$a Greenberg, Joshua M.
245
1
 
$a From BetaMax to Blockbuster : $b video stores and the invention of movies on video / $c by Joshua M. Greenberg.
260
 
 
$a Cambridge, Mass. : $b The MIT Press, $c 2007.
263
 
 
$a 0804
300
 
 
$a p. cm.
504
 
 
$a Includes bibliographical references and index.
599
 
 
$a A Apr08
650
 
 
$a Videocassette recorders.
650
 
 
$a Video recordings industry $x History.
948
 
 
$a 03/14/2008 $b 04/01/2008
994
 
 
$a C0 $b ZQP
995
 
 
$a UAFZAL/MJACOBS-CC
999
 
 
$a VIRTUA50
1184918

Terms & Conditions