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Cover image for Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
ISBN#9780743487573
BIB ID#883499

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

0
Author
Publisher
Washington Square Pr 2004
Description
464 p.
Summary
"All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn," Ernest Hemingway wrote, "It's the best book we've had." A complex masterpiece that has spawned volumes of scholarly exegesis and interpretative theories, it is at heart a compelling adventure story. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Nigger Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft thrillingly through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat, betrayal by rogues, and the final threat from the bourgeoisie. Informing all this is the presence of the River, described in palpable detail by Mark Twain, the former steamboat pilot, who transforms it into a richly metaphoric entity. Twain's other great innovation was the language of the book itself, which is expressive in a completely original way. "The invention of this language, with all its implications, gave a new dimension to our literature," Robert Penn Warren noted. "It is a language capable of poetry."

Reviews and Notes

Summary/Annotation ->  Enriched Classics offer readers accessible editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and commentary. Each book includes educational tools alongside the text, enabling students and readers alike to gain a deeper and more developed understanding of the writer and their work. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn follows Tom Sawyer's best friend on his wildly entertaining exploits with runaway slave, Jim, recounted in vernacular English and vibrant descriptions of life along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society, which had ceased to exist at the time of its publication, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is often regarded as a scathing satire on the institution of racism and the attitudes that supported it. However, it is also a playful story about the joys and evils of childhood as well as the limitless possibilities it allows. Enriched Classics enhance your engagement by introducing and explaining the historical and cultural significance of the work, the author's personal history, and what impact this book had on subsequent scholarship. Each book includes discussion questions that help clarify and reinforce major themes and reading recommendations for further research. Read with confidence.

Availability

LocationCall NumberItem TypeVolumesort iconBarcodeStatus
AuburndaleAdult Paperback0228498702551Available
McGoldrickAdult Paperback0228507355441Available
McGoldrickAdult Paperback0228507355425Due 9-4-2014
Langston HughesAdult Paperback0228432056080Due 9-2-2014
Jackson HeightsJJuvenile Paperback0228548670055Available
LaureltonJJuvenile Paperback0228446830017Available
CoronaFICAdult Paperback0228515650718Available
LaureltonJJuvenile Paperback0228446829985Available
LaureltonJJuvenile Paperback0228446829993Available
LaureltonJJuvenile Paperback0228446830009Available
Briarwood - Young AdultFICAdult Paperback0228518384067Due 8-20-2014

Marc Record

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$a "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn," Ernest Hemingway wrote, "It's the best book we've had." A complex masterpiece that has spawned volumes of scholarly exegesis and interpretative theories, it is at heart a compelling adventure story. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Nigger Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft thrillingly through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat, betrayal by rogues, and the final threat from the bourgeoisie. Informing all this is the presence of the River, described in palpable detail by Mark Twain, the former steamboat pilot, who transforms it into a richly metaphoric entity. Twain's other great innovation was the language of the book itself, which is expressive in a completely original way. "The invention of this language, with all its implications, gave a new dimension to our literature," Robert Penn Warren noted. "It is a language capable of poetry."
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