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Douglaston/Little Neck

Open Budget Hearing

Queens Library invites the community to its open budget hearing. Please join us to learn about our funding priorities and contribute to the discussion.

You are invited to review the proposed budget priorities here. Public comments are encouraged. Speakers may sign up upon arrival and will have an opportunity to speak on a ...

31 Books for Women's History Month!

 

In honor of Women’s History Month, Queens Library is posting pictures of noteworthy books by women authors to our social media sites every day!

These 31 books include literary classics, memoirs, children’s books and more.

You can see our choices by checking out our social media sites, including ...

Learn How to Code and Become a Tech Leader!

Have you ever wanted a career in the growing tech field but don't have the skills you need?

Join us at Flushing on Wednesday, April 1 and the Central Library on Thursday, April 2 to find out how to apply for a great learning opportunity and a full scholarship!

Coalition for Queens (C4Q) is a local nonprofit ...

A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Queens Library's Langston Hughes Community Library and Cultural Center proudly presents “America is a Dream… A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” Please join us to learn about the struggle for civil rights and enjoy this all-day blend of speakers, film, dramatic presentation and live music on Saturday, April 4, ...

Invest in Libraries! Invest in New Yorkers!

Queens Library, Brooklyn Public Library and the New York Public Library have come together to let Mayor De Blasio and the New York City Council know that NYC’s libraries need more funding to stay open more hours and address our capital needs.

We Need You to add your voice to ...

Teen Battle of the Bands

Many bands will enter but only one will be chosen as the winner of  the first ever Teen Battle of the Bands. Come and watch local teen bands battle.   Join us at the Flushing branch on April 7, 5-7 PM.  For FREE tickets and more information, click here.

Charles Turner Jazz Trio Concert

"Charles Turner is the real deal, a rising star with mad skills and a voice to match!" -- Brent Black, CriticalJazz.com. 

Charles has thrilled audiences around the world having performed in Germany, France, Switzerland, Spain and Russia and most recently Jazz At Lincoln Center in Doha Qatar, and now Queens Central ...

Help Us Find the Next Queens Poet Laureate!

The search is on! Borough President Melinda Katz, Queens College and Queens Library are partnering together to find the next Queens Poet Laureate, who will be charged with promoting a love of poetry and literacy throughout our borough.

Queens Library is happy to join the Poet Laureate partnership for the first time this year, and ...

Need Help With the NYPD Exam?

Are you interested in the NYPD Police Officer Entrance Examination? The NYPD Recruitment Section is offering a free tutorial program at the Central Library for all applicants who are interested in taking the exam.

Police Officer instructors will offer applicants helpful test-taking skills and strategies so you can achieve your ...

Apr
1
4:00PM

--to--

5:15PM

The Joys of Beekeeping

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Ruth Harrigan, a Douglaston resident and core member of the New York City Beekeepers Association, will lecture on the joys of beekeeping and the importance of our little apian friends in the global environment. She will also conduct a honey-tasting demonstration. Please join us! Light refreshments will be served.


Apr
2
2:00PM

--to--

3:30PM

English Conversation Club

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Improve your English vocabulary, grammar and pronunciation with Lucette and Arline on Monday and Thursday afternoons, except holidays. We will talk about holidays, cooking, shopping, art, music, family and other topics of interest. Your school-aged children are welcome in the Reading Room while we meet. Call or visit the library for more information.

Additional Program Dates/Locations
This is a recurring program. If registration is required, you must register individually.

Additional Dates


Apr
2
4:30PM

--to--

5:45PM

Book Discussion and Activity for Girls

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Join Mrs. Tina and parent volunteers for a discussion, for girls ages 7-10, of "All-of-a-Kind Family" by Sydney Taylor. Participants must read the book before attending the meeting. Copies are available at the Customer Service Desk. Participation will count toward the Read Down Your Fines program.


More...
Apr
3
10:15AM

--to--

10:45AM

Mother Goose Time

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Online or by phone
Availability: 7 openings

Children ages 9-23 months join Mrs. Tina for nursery rhymes, songs, stories, fingerplays and more. Preregistration required. Space is limited.

Additional Program Dates/Locations
This is a recurring program. If registration is required, you must register individually.

Additional Dates


Apr
6
3:30PM

--to--

5:00PM

Knit and Crochet Club

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Adults, teens and kids of all levels are welcome. Bring your own yarn, needles and ideas. Space is limited. Preregistration is required.

Additional Program Dates/Locations
This is a recurring program. If registration is required, you must register individually.

Additional Dates


Apr
6
6:00PM

--to--

7:45PM

An Evening with Donna Barron and the First Nations of Long Island

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Author and historian Donna "Gentle Spirit" Barron of the Little Neck Matinecock Native American Community will read from several of her works and discuss the history of Long Island's various First Nations. Joining her will be Harry Wallace, Chief of the Unkechaug Nation of the Poospatuck Indian Reservation in Mastic, Long Island, and Osceola Townsend, Chief of the Matinecocks. Light refreshments will be served. Seating is limited; first come, first served.


Apr
7
2:00PM

--to--

3:00PM

Songwriters of the Golden Age

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Singer Tom Smith performs standards of the Golden Age of American songwriting, from Irving Berlin to Duke Ellington and more.


Apr
8
10:45AM

--to--

11:15AM

STEAM Toddler Time

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Online or by phone
Availability: 7 openings

Children ages 2 to 3½, accompanied by a parent or other adult caregiver, listen to stories, sing songs and learn about science, technology, engineering, architecture and mathematics (STEAM), too!

Additional Program Dates/Locations
This is a recurring program. If registration is required, you must register individually.

Additional Dates


Apr
9
6:00PM

--to--

7:15PM

African-American Contributions to the United States Military: from Revolutionary War to Vietnam

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Louise Dente, founder and Executive Producer of Cultural Caravan Productions, Inc., will describe CCPTV, a weekly public television program on the history and culture of Africa and its diaspora. Dr. William Seraile, Professor Emeritus of African and African-American Studies at Lehman College, will then discuss African-American contributions to the US military from Revolutionary War to Vietnam. The lecture will include video footage and slides and will close with a question-and-answer session.


Apr
10
4:00PM

--to--

5:00PM

Art Gallery Exhibit: Opening Reception

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Meet Artist-in-Residence Irene Symons and view six of her gorgeous watercolor paintings, which will be on display from April 1 to June 30 in the library's art gallery. Hear the artist talk about her work, and enjoy refreshments and friendly conversation.


Apr
16
12:00PM

--to--

12:30PM

Sign, Read and Learn

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Registration is not yet open for this program. Please check back closer to the program date.
Details: Customers are required to attend all sessions of this program. Registering for this session will reserve your spot for the entire program.

Sing, hear stories and use props, scarves, parachutes and bubbles, all while learning over 100 ASL vocabulary words and bonding with your child age 4 and under! This 8-week interactive course for preschoolers and their parents is presented by Nuts for Signs. Preregistration is required by calling the library.


Apr
16
6:00PM

--to--

7:30PM

Friends of the Library Executive Board Meeting

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

All community members are welcome to attend this monthly meeting of the Executive Board of the Friends of Douglaston/Little Neck Community Library.


Apr
17
4:00PM

--to--

5:15PM

The Poetry of Emily Dickinson

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Bette S. Weidman, Associate Professor of English and Director of American Studies at Queens College, CUNY, will discuss the serene beauty as well as the historical, cultural and social significance of the poetry of one of America's premier poets and poetic innovators, Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). Handouts of Dickinson's poetry will be distributed, and a question-and-answer session will follow the lecture. Light refreshments will be served.


Apr
23
4:00PM

--to--

5:15PM

Composting

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Online or by phone
Availability: 5 openings

An expert from the New York City Compost Project, hosted by Queens Botanical Garden, will present information to children and adults about indoor and outdoor composting, what and why to compost, the decomposition process and compost troubleshooting. The 4:00PM session is for children; the 6:00PM session is for adults. Preregistration is required; space is limited to the first 15 registrants. Preregister online or at 718-225-8414.

Additional Program Dates/Locations
This is a recurring program. If registration is required, you must register individually.

Additional Dates


Apr
24
3:30PM

--to--

4:30PM

Birds of Queens

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Queens is diverse not only in its human population but in its avian population as well. Join avian enthusiast Shari Romar, New Media Manager at Queens Botanical Garden, on a virtual tour of our borough's natural habitats, from forest to meadow to wetland, and learn about the birds that use them. Light refreshments will be served. This program is sponsored by the Friends of Douglaston-Little Neck Library.


Apr
27
6:30PM

--to--

7:15PM

An Evening of Song with Daphnee Fortunate

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Songstress Daphnee Fortunate will weave her vocal magic through new, soulful renditions of jazz and pop standards from the 20th and 21st centuries in a musical journey that will delight and inspire. Space limited; first come, first served. Light refreshments will be served. This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Douglaston/Little Neck Community Library.


May
5
3:00PM

--to--

4:30PM

Lucille Ball: A Retrospective

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Dr. Ira Epstein explores the life, funniest moments and comedic techniques of television pioneer Lucille Ball.


May
14
6:00PM

--to--

7:00PM

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Trusts and Asset Protection

Location: Douglaston/Little Neck
Registration: Not required

Noted elder-law and estate-planning attorneys will present strategies and consult with you on aspects of elder law, powers of attorney, estate and disability planning, and long-term care. You will learn how to gain income and avoid estate taxes while providing for heirs and charitable interests. You will also gain insights into preserving wealth and increasing lifetime income.


Free computer access is available at all the libraries.

The Douglaston/Little Neck Community Library has:

  • 14 public computers
  • Free Internet access
  • Microsoft Office software
  • Limited free printing

 

Queens Library Public Internet Use Policy.

TBD

TBD

TBD

TBD

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International Language Collections at the Douglaston/Little Neck Community Library include:

  • Chinese
  • Korean

 

Special Interest/Noteworthy Collections at the Douglaston/Little Neck Community Library include:

  • Classics
  • Cooking
  • Large Print
  • Audio Books

 


Child Care / Preschools
Community Board
Community Organizations & Services
Fire Department
Local Hospitals
Local Newspapers
Parks and Playgrounds
Police Department
Post Office
Private / Parochial Schools
Public Elementary Schools
Public Intermediate / Junior High Schools
Senior Centers
Elected Officials
History
Special Services

Child Care / Preschools
ABC Early Learning Center
54-25 Little Neck Parkaway
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 225-8044
Community Church of Douglaston Universal Pre-Kindergarten
39-50 Douglaston Parkaway
Douglaston NY , 11363
phone: (718) 229-2169
Community Church of Little Neck Universal Pre-Kindergarten
46-16 Little Neck Parkaway
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 229-9389
fax: (718) 357-2860

Community Board
Community Board District #11
46-21 Little Neck Parkway
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 225-1054
fax: (718) 225-4514
  

Community Organizations & Services
Little Neck Pines Civic Association, Inc.
P.O. Box 331
Little Neck NY , 11363
phone: (917) 373-0921
Westmoreland Association, Inc.
251-31 42nd Avenue
Little Neck NY , 11363
 

Fire Department
Engine 306
40-18 214 Place
Queens NY , 11361
Engine 326 Battalion 53
64-04 Springfield Blvd.
Bayside NY , 11364
 

Local Hospitals
Long Island Jewish Hospital
270-05 76th Avenue
New Hyde Park NY , 11040
phone: 718 or 516 470-7000
North Shore University Hospital (NSUH) / Manhasset
300 Community Drive
Manhasset NY , 11030
phone: (516) 562-0100
 

Local Newspapers
Little Neck Ledger
  

Parks and Playgrounds
Alley Pond Environmental Center
228-06 Northern Boulevard
Douglaston NY , 11363
phone: (718) 229-4000
Louis Pasteur Park
248 Street and 51st Avenue
Little Neck NY , 11632
Sy Seplowe Playground (PS 94)
42 to 43 Avenues and Little Neck Parkway
Little Neck NY , 11362
Udalls Cove Park
Northern Boulevard and 244-247 Streets, Douglas Rd
Little Neck NY , 11362
  

Police Department
NYPD 11th Precinct
45-06 215th Street
Bayside NY , 11361
phone: (718) 279-5200
  

Post Office
Horace Harding Post Office
56-01 Marathon Parkaway
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 224-4492
Little Neck Post Office
250-10 Northern Boulevard
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 229-8573
 

Private / Parochial Schools
Divine Wisdom Catholic Academy
45-11 245th Street
Douglaston NY , 11363
phone: (718) 631-3153
  

Public Elementary Schools
PS 94 David Porter School
41-77 Little Neck Parkway
Little Neck NY , 11363
phone: (718) 423-8491
fax: (718) 423-8531
PS 98 Douglaston School
40-20 235 Street
Douglaston NY , 11363
phone: (718) 423-8535
fax: (718) 423-8550
PS 221 North Hills School
57-40 Marathon Parkway
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 423-8825
fax: (718) 423-8841

Public Intermediate / Junior High Schools
MS 67 Louis Pasteur Middle School (Grades 6-9)
51-60 Marathon Parkway
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 423-8138
fax: (718) 423-8281
Benjamin N. Cardozo High School (Grades 9-12)
57-00 223rd Street
Bayside NY , 11364
phone: (718) 279-6500
 

Senior Centers
Samuel Field Y
58-20 Little Neck Parkaway
Little Neck NY , 11362
phone: (718) 225-6750 ext. 232
  

Elected Officials
NYC Council
Hon. Paul Vallone
District19@council.nyc.gov
District Office Address 42-40 Bell Boulevard, Suite 507
Bayside NY, 11361
phone: (718) 619-8611
fax: (718) 631-4100
Manhattan Office Address 250 Broadway, Suite 1841
New York NY, 10007
phone: 212-788-7250
fax: 212-788-1860
NYS Assembly
Hon. Edward C. Braunstein
braunsteine@assembly.state.ny.us
District Office 213-33 39th Avenue, Suite 238
Bayside NY, 11361
phone: (718) 357-3588
fax: (718) 357-5947
Albany Office LOB, Room 557
Albany NY , 12248
phone: (518) 455-5425
fax: (518) 455-4648
NYS Senate
Hon. Tony Avella
avella@nysenate.gov
District Office 38-50 Bell Boulevard, Suite C
Bayside NY, 11361
phone: (718) 357-3094
fax: (718) 357-3491
Albany Office Room 504, Legislative Office Building
Albany NY, 12247
phone: (518) 455-2210
fax: (518) 426-6736
Boro President
Hon. Melinda Katz
Info@queensbp.org
  
Mayor
Hon. Bill de Blasio
  

History

In colonial times, the Little Neck area was named for the geographical feature of the small peninsula extending into Little Neck Bay. A larger peninsula just to the east was called Great Neck. In the early 1900’s developers wanted residents to sign a petition to change its name to Westmoreland, but the majority declined. The original area of Little Neck has been reduced twice: once in 1872 to create Douglaston and again in 1928 when Nassau County changed the name on its side of its boundary with Queens County to Great Neck.

In 1872, Douglaston was named for William P. Douglas, who inherited the estate on the peninsula for which Little Neck was named from his father, George Douglas. When the Flushing Railroad, now the Long Island Rail Road, decided to create an additional stop one mile west of their Little Neck depot, William moved the former Van Zandt chapel to serve as its station. In exchange, he asked that the station and the surrounding village be named Douglaston.

When Henry Hudson sailed to Manhattan in the early 1600’s, the Matinecoc Indians lived in northern Long Island. Seafood, game, and corn were plentiful. Abundant clam shells for making wampum made them the wealthiest Indians on Long Island. The Matinecoc made white wampum from the periwinkles and the more valuable black wampum from quohog.

The Dutch West India Company encouraged settlement in the New Netherlands. A circular of the time promoted Long Island as Eden-like with “deer, sixteen hands high, buffaloes which could be ridden and broken to the plow, large turkeys, 500 to the flock, and clear spring waters equal to light Dutch beer.”

Thomas Foster had fled from England to Holland due to religious persecution. He and his family were the first to settle on the northern shore on Long Island. In 1637 they built a small stone house with one window and wooden shutters where “the Alley” now meets Northern Boulevard.

New Englanders Richard Cornell, a Quaker from Rhode Island, and Thomas Hicks from Massachusetts were two of the earliest landowners in Little Neck. Thomas Hicks used force against the Matinecoc to secure his holdings.

In 1664 the Dutch surrendered the New Netherlands to a British fleet of 24 ships. New Amsterdam became New York. Queens was named for Catherine of Braganza, queen of their new ruler, the British monarch, Charles II. Britain ruled the area for the next one hundred and nineteen years.

Agriculture continued to be the mainstay of life. The Allens operated a mill that shrank and tightened homespun woolens woven on hand looms. The woolens could then be made into cloth. In 1752, James Hedges began to operate a gristmill in the Alley.

Cornelius Van Wyck built a house on his estate in 1735. Today it is noted for its hand-hewn shingles and salt box type roof. The interior has been restored. It is one of the few surviving Dutch colonial houses within New York City, and is designated a New York City Landmark.

The British occupied Long Island throughout the Revolutionary War, from August 28, 1776 to Nov. 21, 1783. They and their Hessian mercenaries used it as a staging and supply area. Everything was at British disposal; private homes, horses, livestock, crops, and forests. As the record says, “Soon there wasn’t a picket fence or a four-legged animal, except dogs, left standing.”

Hessians looted the Foster homestead and hung elderly Thomas Foster, descendant of the original settler, from an apple tree. Company commander Foster rescued him and personally “ran through” one of the Hessian soldiers with his sword.

General Washington designated Colonel Benjamin Tallmadge to create a network of spies among the occupying British forces. These spies included a merchant, an innkeeper, a farmer and several housewives. All risked the fate of Nathan Hale. One recruit used clothing on her clothesline to relay signals. Another gave dinner parties “to honor” British officers and gleaned information from their conversations. Couriers rode the dangerous muddy roads in the dark of night. This network helped foil Benedict Arnold’s plan to surrender West Point. Finally the British were defeated and withdrew.

In 1790, recently inaugurated President George Washington visited the Alley. He acknowledged a welcome and had refreshments at the tavern.

The Alley Pond settlement continued to grow and was the great center of the way of life in Little Neck. By 1813 it included gentlemen farmers, small “truck” farmers, merchants, artisans and oystermen.

In 1819 Wynant Van Zandt III, a wealthy New York merchant and alderman, purchased the peninsular estate on Little Neck Bay and built a large square mansion for his wife and fifteen children. Ten years later, he donated part of the funds and the land to build the Zion Episcopal Church.

When Van Zandt died in 1831, his heirs sold his estate in two parts. It time, the southern part became Douglaston Hill and the northern part Douglas Manor.

Joseph De Forest purchased the southern part and resold it to Cortland Van Beuren, who in turn sold it to Jeremiah Lambertson. Lambertson divided the land into generous 200 ft. by 200 ft. lots with streets named for trees. On July 23 and 27, 1853, he sold the lots to eighteen buyers. However, for the next fifty years very little building was done.

George Douglas, a wealthy Scot, bought the northern peninsula section and began to plant trees imported from all over the world. In 1862 when he died, his eighteen-year-old son William inherited his estate. “Willie” was known as a playboy and sailor of big yachts. For “Willie” the estate was a social hub for entertaining the wealthy and powerful of New York, including Gordon Bennet, publisher of the New York Herald, and financier J. P. Morgan. Their yachts were often moored on the Bay. In 1871 Willie won the first America’s Cup aboard the Sappho.

In 1866, when the Flushing Railroad reached Little Neck, the Old Depot served as its station. Soon the railroad created an additional stop one mile to the west. William donated the former chapel of the Van Zandt family to serve as its station. In exchange, he requested that the station and the village around it be named Douglaston.

Twenty years later, in 1887, “Willie” and resident subscribers funded a Queen Anne-style building and landscaping for the new Douglaston depot. Travelers still needed to take the ferry between Long Island City and New York since the rail line still had not reached Manhattan.

The great years of Little Neck clamming began in the 1860s. Capt. Christian W. Kirkman, a Danish sailor and fisherman, found he could increase the clam yield by planting oyster beds among them. The clams burrowed under the oyster beds to spawn, and multiplied at an incredible rate. These small hard clams were served in the best restaurants of New York and several European capitals. The industry was ruined by pollution from the city in the 1890s.

In 1898, Queens County became part of New York City. Many homes were built in anticipation of a direct route to Manhattan. Two major public works were finished by 1910, the Pennsylvania Railroad tunnel under the East River and the Queensborough Bridge. The city’s building of roads and bridges spurred tremendous suburban growth.

In 1905, The Rickert-Finlay Company bought the Benjamin Woolley farm and created the Westmoreland Development. They laid out streets and building lots. The 270 homes were given covenants and restrictions with their property deeds to preserve the atmosphere of comfortable living close to New York. These homes were advertised with the not quite accurate slogan “only 26 minutes to Manhattan”.

The following year, in 1906, William Douglas sold his property to the Rickert-Finlay Company. They developed the 175-acre estate into a carefully planned garden suburb town called Douglas Manor. The manor house served as a clubhouse and social center. Each home was within one mile of the station. Its 550 single-family homes include Queen Anne, Colonial, Tudor, and Mediterranean Revival architecture.

Douglaston Hill consists of the area between Douglas Manor and Northern Boulevard, bounded by Douglaston Parkway to the west, and 244th Street to the east. In the late 1800’s it was occupied by a variety of people, including summer residents, local tradesmen, and free blacks that worked in the oyster industry. In the early twentieth century most homes were built in anticipation of the completion of the railroad tunnel under the East River to create a direct route to Manhattan. Architectural styles in the area include Queen Anne, Craftsman, Bungalow, American Foursquare, Tudor Revival, and Colonial Revival. The oldest property in the district is the Zion Episcopal Church.

The rest of Douglaston and Little Neck developed rapidly, mostly with one family houses. The increased population needed increased services. Telephones, a volunteer fire department, a Mothers Club, Christian Endeavor Societies, schools, the American Red Cross, a library, a bank, a Girl Scout and a Boy Scout Troop, a newspaper, a garden club, and several places of worship were active by the middle of the 1930s.

When Northern Boulevard was widened in 1930, the remains from a Matinecoc Indian burial ground were reinterred on land at the Zion Episcopal Church.

With improved transportation to Douglaston and Little Neck, the importance of the Alley settlement waned. The City of New York Parks Department acquired much of the land. During the 1930s, through the Parks efforts to convert the area for recreational use and through the construction of the Long Island Expressway and Cross Island Parkway, several of the older structures were cleared and much of the marshland filled in. This marshland is now recognized as a vital link in nature’s ecosystem.

In 1974, the Parks Department created the Wetlands Reclamation Project and began rehabilitation of the natural wetlands of the park. Alley Pond Environmental Center, a National Environmental Study Area since 1976, has encouraged awareness of the environment. It serves families and over 20,000 students annually, offering hiking, birding, lectures, workshops, and tours. Alley Pond Park contains over 635 acres of forested hills, ponds, meadow, and salt marshes.

Since the 1970s, environmentalists have actively sought to preserve the salt marshes in Udalls Cove for the sake of Little Neck Bay. The Udalls Cove Preservation Committee was formed to lobby city planners to keep the cove as a national wildlife preserve.

A 600-year-old White Oak tree, the oldest tree on Long Island, stands at 233 Arleigh Road in Douglas Manor.

During the 1990’s, the Douglaston/Little Neck Historical Society headed the drive to preserve the two unique residential developments of Douglas Manor and Douglaston Hill. As of 2004, each area is designated as a New York City Historic District.

Sentiments spoken by a resident a few years ago still seem relevant, “What people here want is a continuation of the community this has been for years and whose essence is a rustic New England type town. Our community is the bay, the wetlands, large old trees and the beauty of nature around us that provides a sense of openness and of peace and quiet.”

In 1914, the Queens Borough Public Library opened a small branch in a Douglaston real estate office with 587 books. The next year, through the efforts of the Mothers Club and the school principal, the collection was moved to P.S. 94. Additional moves included the Community Church and 248-04 Northern Boulevard. On April 4 1962, the Douglaston/Little Neck Branch opened its doors in its new improved and expanded quarters at its present location of 249-01 Northern Boulevard.

Sources:

Douglaston Little Neck Historical Society: http://www.dlnhs.org

Flux, James A. and Levine Ty, Bayside Its Yesterdays and Tomorrows, the History of Bayside, Bayside, New York 1957

“The Fosters Made Their Mark on Early Queens” by Joan Brown Wettingfeld who is a historian, free-lance writer and member of the Borough President’s History Advisory Committee, Times/Ledger, May 5, 1994.

Fowler, George C. and Ernestine, Through the Years in Little Neck and Douglaston, Angle Offset, 1963.

Gubernick, Loys, Little Neck Then...and Now, Loys Gubernick, 1982.

Historical Walking Tour, 1975

History of Little Neck, 1952

Little Neck, Douglaston—In profile, by Gene Gleason of the Herald Tribune Staff, Herald Tribune, Dec. 22, 1963.

Long Island Division, Queens Borough Public Library, 89-11 Merrick Boulevard, Jamaica, NY

Queens Scape, Douglaston/Little Neck, Carol Polsky, Newsday, Sunday Dec 31, 1989

Shaman, Diana, If You’re Thinking of Living in: Douglaston, New York Times, March 25, 1990.