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Children & Teens

Children & Teens

Services for children and youth are paramount at Queens Library. The Library offers after-school activities, homework help programs, and toddler learning centers.

 

 

  • Some 383,830 children and young adults attended story times, magic shows, video-teleconferences, hands-on science demos, poetry “slams” and other programs at Queens Library. Chess clubs were the rage for teens.
  • 39,000 children and adults attended the popular summer exhibit Brainstorm: A Problem-solving Odyssey in the Queens Library Gallery, which featured a variety of interactive stations and weekly programming, such as storytelling and craft workshops.
  • The Connecting Libraries and Schools Program (CLASP) was suspended mid-year due to budget constraints. Branches picked-up the responsibility of school visits, to keep the all-important school-library connection alive.
  • The kid-friendly Queens Library web page, KidsLinQ™, got an overhaul, and TeenLinQ debuted for young adults. They direct young people to the best homework help resources on the web, authoritative sites to help with common concerns and fun stuff, too.
  • Through a grant from the Department of Juvenile Justice, the library-based Laurelton Youth Empowerment Initiative focuses on the needs of children and teens living in the area. A youth counselor on-site engages their interest with a variety of age-specific programming, while on the lookout for problems that should be referred to a social services counselor, also on-site. Disruptive incidents at the branch and the immediate neighborhood have dropped drastically.
  • Latchkey and Homework Assistance Programs in 35 branches and Central Library gave 140,600 children a safe, academically-oriented haven after school. A special fundraiser sponsored by Caffé on the Green raised needed funds for this important service.
  • The KidsWorld Queenssm calendar listed hundreds of free and low-cost programs and activities sponsored by Queens’ educational and cultural organizations during the summer of 2001. Some 240,000 were distributed throughout the Borough.
  • Thanks to a grant from the Charles B. Wang Foundation, the first Toddler Learning Centers were held in Chinese.